Dr Terri Simpkin: Faking it – de-mythologising the imposter ‘syndrome’

Faking it: de-mythologising the imposter ‘syndrome’

Join Terri for a deeper dive at the Thrive In Action workshop weekend!


Terri is an Associate Professor in Management and MBA Director at the University of Tasmania.  She has enjoyed a broad international career in the education sector as an academic and leader, holding global roles with Anglia Ruskin University and Nottingham University in the UK.  Not being born an academic she also has broad experience in private sector leadership in human resources, strategy and business management.  

Having worked internationally with governments, industry associations, large organisations and SMEs for two decades she is a current consultant to industry and has become known as a research informed, practice lead academic particularly regarding complex challenges facing contemporary workforces now and into the future.

Terri was named as one of the 50 most influential women in the data economy for her work on digital infrastructure sector workforce challenges and was awarded the Brynn Fowler Agent of Change award by Global Women in Telco and Tech for her work advancing inclusion and diversity both in and outside of the workplace. She was also named in the 2020 IMasons 100 Awards for her work in developing leadership education in the global Digital Infrastructure sector.

Continuing her academic interest into the topic, she is known as an authority on the impostor phenomenon reflecting her professional interest in contemporary inclusion practices and global workforce challenges. Her website ForFakeSake.org aims to diminish the myths and fallacies associated with the experience of IP.

She is a dedicated (some say tragic) Duran Duran fan and devotee of the late Sir Terry Pratchett.  Her lectures on topics such as leadership, diversity & belonging, and management in the Discworld novels have been sell out successes at the Cambridge Festival of Ideas among other fora.

Find out more from Terri on her website.